REVIEW: “All of Me” at Barrington Stage

by Roseann Cane With its world premiere production of All of Me, written by Laura Winters, Barrington Stage Company presents a romantic boy-meets-girl coming-of-age story unlike any play I’ve ever seen, and, I believe, one that’s long overdue. You see, boy uses wheelchair, girl uses scooter, and both use text-to-speech…

REVIEW: “Xanadu” at the Mac-Haydn Theatre

by Barbara Waldinger Picture a musical consisting of seven of the nine Greek Muses, daughters of Zeus (supposedly the other two are in the band), two of whom are males, whose leader (Clio, the Muse of History) wears roller skates, changes her name, and speaks with a bizarre Australian accent…

REVIEW: “Shelley’s Shadow” at Bridge Street Theatre

by Macey Levin Anyone who has been or is a caretaker for a victim of dementia knows the emotional turmoil it causes.  What seems to start as a simple element of aging grows into a life-changing responsibility.  One’s personal time no longer exists.  Quietude no longer exists.  In some cases…

REVIEW: “Shear Madness” at the Sharon Playhouse

by Macey Levin On a recent Thursday evening hundreds of people in Sharon, Connecticut suffered from a similar malady.  Their sides were aching from the non-stop laughter at Sharon Playhouse’s hoot of a show Shear Madness.  There is very little time to catch one’s breath with a host of sterling…

REVIEW: “Measure for Measure” at Shakespeare & Company

by Barbara Waldinger Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure, now being staged at Shakespeare & Company’s Tina Packer Playhouse, is known as a “problem play.”  Neither tragedy nor comedy, it lives somewhere in between, which is probably why it is rarely produced.  But this Lenox company ended up with more problems than…

REVIEW: “Waiting for Godot” at Barrington Stage

by Macey Levin One of the first plays of the Theatre of the Absurd was Jean Genet’s “The Maids” in 1947 which was followed by Eugene Ionesco’s “The Bald Soprano” in 1950.  This is a theatrical form that alludes to the absurdity of existence in a grotesque world by a…

REVIEW: Berkshire Opera Festival’s “Don Giovanni”

by Barbara Waldinger In the age of Harvey Weinstein and Jeffrey Epstein, how is a director embarking on a production of one of the many versions of the Don Juan story to approach the lasciviousness of the main character?   Beginning in the Middle Ages, across multiple genres and cultures…

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